Greek Fava Crostini

IMG_6941Fava. Not Fava beans. Just Fava. Greeks know what I’m talking about. For my non-Greeks, I can best describe Fava as a yellow split pea puree that is simple to make, yet full of flavor.

At home, my mom would serve up a hot plate of Fava topped with olive oil and finely chopped onion. It was always accompanied by a traditional Greek salad and fresh crusty bread.

In Greece, you’ll find different variations for serving Fava- each adored by the people who make and eat it. The island of Santorini is particularly famous for their Fava.

Recently, I decided to make Fava crostini and experiment with some different topping combinations. The result? Wow. The earthy flavor of the Fava pairs perfectly with any topping that has a little acidity or bite to it. So have a little fun with this one and try your own combinations. Then (of course), let me know how it turns out so I can try it.

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GREEK FAVA CROSTINI
Serves 6 (As an Appetizer)

For the Fava:

1 cup yellow split peas
3 cups vegetable broth or water
1 small onion, chopped
olive oil

salt and pepper, to taste

To Serve:

sliced and toasted french baguette
topping combinations of your choice

Rinse and drain the yellow split peas. In a medium saucepan, sauté the chopped onions with olive oil. Once the onions are semi-translucent, add the yellow split peas and vegetable broth or water to the pot. Add the salt and pepper.  Stir once, cover and bring to boil. Remove any white foam that rises to the surface with a large spoon. Reduce to a simmer and allow to cook for 25-35 minutes stirring and checking the consistency periodically.

Tip: If you overcook your Fava and it becomes too thick, don’t fret-just add a little water to the pot and allow to cook until you’ve reached your desired consistency. I’ve learned that the best time turn off the heat is when you think it’s not quite as thick as you want it. As soon as the Fava begins cooling, it will thicken to the perfect consistency.

 

 

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